Spread The Cheer

by Antonio Sini ...

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How far can you make your smile travel? Nothing has more power to elevate a mood than the impact of a genuine smile. Surprisingly enough, the benefits of a smile extend not only to the recipient of the warm gesture but also to the smile's originator.

Smiling will send a positive message to the person you express yourself to. This can potentially change that person's mood, making them feel better and in turn smile too. As that person's day goes on, his or her smile brightens the day of someone new ...and so on and so on.

Your smile could potentially travel from person to person, eventually reaching and brightening up the day of a loved one many miles away. So the next time you think of your Aunt Betty in Waterloo, Wisconsin, send her some good cheer. Simply smile at the first person you see and let that smile find it's way to her (I recommend you give her a call too).

Here are some fascinating scientific facts about our smiles from Sebastian Gendry (aka The Laughter Consultant):

Simulating a genuine smile can boost your mood: Psychologists have found that even if you’re in bad mood, you can instantly lift your spirits by simulating (not fake, but choose to engage in)  a genuine smile.

It boosts your immune system: Smiling can improve your physical health, too. Your body is more relaxed when you smile, which contributes to good health and a stronger immune system.

Smiles are contagious: It’s not just a saying: smiling really is contagious, scientists say. In a study conducted in Sweden, people had difficulty frowning when they looked at other subjects who were smiling, and their muscles twitched into smiles on their own.

Smiles Relieve Stress:  Your body immediately releases endorphins when you smile, even when you force it. This sudden change in mood will help you feel better and release stress.

It’s a universal sign of happiness: While hand shakes, hugs, and bows all have varying meanings across cultures, smiling is known around the world and in all cultures as a sign of happiness and acceptance.

We still smile at work: While we smile less at work than we do at home, 30% of subjects in a research study smiled five to 20 times a day, and 28% smiled over 20 times per day at the office.

Smiles use from 5 to 53 facial muscles: Just smiling can require your body to use up to 53 muscles, but some smiles only use 5 muscle movements.

Babies are born with the ability to smile: Babies learn a lot of behaviors and sounds from watching the people around them, but scientists believe that all babies are born with the ability, since even blind babies smile.

Smiling helps you get promoted: Smiles make a person seem more attractive, sociable and confident, and people who smile more are more likely to get a promotion.

Smiles are the most easily recognizable facial expression: People can recognize smiles from up to 300 feet away, making it the most easily recognizable facial expression.

Women smile more than men: Generally, women smile more than men, but when they participate in similar work or social roles, they smile the same amount. This finding leads scientists to believe that gender roles are quite flexible. Boy babies, though, do smile lessthan girl babies, who also make more eye contact.

Smiles are more attractive than makeup: A research study conducted by Orbit Complete discovered that 69% of people find women more attractive when they smile than when they are wearing makeup.

There are 19 different types of smiles: UC-San Francisco researcher identified 19 types of smiles and put them into two categories: polite “social” smiles which engage fewer muscles, and sincere “felt” smiles that use more muscles on both sides of the face.